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5 things wind energy technicians know are true

There's no easy way to describe a typical day working in the wind industry, and that's just the way people who have these roles like it. Talk to a wind technician and here's what they'll probably say:

1. It's a busy business.

Currently 85,000 Americans work in the wind energy industry – that's it. Industry sources report that there is a current shortage of trained wind technicians. People are demanding wind power – which means they're demanding the expertise of wind technicians. With a lack of trained professionals in an exploding industry, jobs are readily available, and there's no such thing as a "slow day at work."

2. On the road, again – and again.

Most wind jobs are in the Midwest, Southwest and Northeast regions of the U.S. Texas, Iowa and California lead all states in wind power generating capacity, but other states, like Illinois, Indiana, Oregon and Washington are in the process of majorly increasing their capacity. Wind technicians can cover an entire region of wind farms – so travel is frequent.

3. Adventure seekers, apply here.

Something is always changing in the wind field and no two days are the same. Projects are found in a variety of locations. And, if it's not in a different location, then it's probably a different stage of installation. From site planning and base steel work to electrical installation and final tower testing, wind technicians have to be ready for anything and to do anything. Every day is a new adventure!

4. Safety above all.

By far the most critical aspect of the wind technician training program is safety. It is part of the culture of employment! Being safe on the job is THE number one priority. Because the average wind turbine is over 300 feet high, wind technicians are equipped with a Personal Fall Arrest System for self-rescue. They are also trained in electrical safety, as they work around voltages up to 34.5kv. Competent climb and tower rescue, first aid/CPR and mechanical safety, crane signal and rigging practice are all skills that must be mastered by wind technicians before they can go out into the field.

5. Wind technicians are just like Batman, but with a salary.

Wind technicians are always on call to make the world a better place. Many states have been putting laws in place to reduce carbon dioxide emissions – including laws that require 10 percent of all electricity produced to be renewable. The call for more wind energy and trained wind energy technicians has exploded. Wind farms are a clean source of power and are becoming less expensive than they used to be. According to the most recent data, wind technicians can provide and manage a clean source of energy to the entire country while making an average of $45,970 per year.

Many wind technicians have decided they'd rather do anything else but sit inside a cubicle for a large part of their day. Some have chosen the industry to make a green, clean difference in current energy usage, others want a more fulfilling career path – either way, they are the kind of people that like to mix it up, problem-solve and stay on their toes. That's why the traditional desk job is brain-numbing. In the wind energy industry, a technician will find themselves outside in the fresh air and sunshine, always presented with new challenges and opportunities to lead. That beats any desk job, doesn't it?