Renewable energy industry news roundup: April 24–May 1, 2016

Renewable energy industry news roundup: April 24–May 1, 2016

Image: Milko Vuille/CC BY-SA 4.0

New York becomes the model state for adopting renewable energy, Virginia adds jobs in wind energy, and a solar powered plane travels around the world. Read these stories and more in this week's news roundup:

New York implements programs that could be model for state-level climate action

New York is becoming an exemplary state in its approach to tackling climate change. Under the administration of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, New York has passed its 50% by 2030 Clean Energy Standard, signed an international Memorandum of Understanding to curb its carbon emissions 80% by 2050 and enacted a 10-year plan to drive clean energy development. The Long Island Power Authority might partner with Cuomo to add an installed offshore wind capacity of 5,000 megawatts by 2025.

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Study: World could end fossil fuel use in 10 years

The world could phase out fossil fuels within a decade, according to a new study. Writing in the journal Energy Research & Social Science, Benjamin Sovacool, Director of the Sussex Energy Group at the University of Sussex, says the world could wean itself off the polluting fuels quickly, given a “collaborative, interdisciplinary, multi-scalar effort.”

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Report eyes jobs in Virginia offshore wind industry

Virginia could see as many as 14,000 jobs in the offshore wind energy industry over the next 15 years, according to a report issued by a group called the American Jobs Project. The report, written in partnership with Virginia Tech and issued this month, said the state is particularly well-positioned for the placement of offshore turbines.

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Experimental solar-powered plane completes journey across the Pacific

Experimental solar-powered plane Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Mountain View, Calif., after a three-day flight across the Pacific. The Solar Impulse team is attempting to fly around the world using only the power of the sun.

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World's biggest windmills now make jumbo jets look tiny

Often derided as a blot on rural landscapes, wind turbines got bigger and stronger than ever anyway. The next generation are even larger and designed to withstand an Arctic battering. The granddaddy of them all is a machine with rotors that cut a 164 meter (538 foot) swath made by a Vestas Wind Systems venture with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. A single blade is 80 meters, about the entire wingspan of an Airbus A380 jumbo jet

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